Some of the Seismology-Related Presentations at the 2007 NSTA Meeting

 

 

Using EarthScope Data for Authentic Learning
Thursday, 3/29/2007 3:30–4:30 PM
[Earth,Middle Level-High School]
Presenters: Michael Wysession (Washington University in St. Louis: St. Louis, MO)

Students can use EarthScope data to discover the processes underlying natural hazards. Here we'll show you how to access and use the data via the Internet.

 

Tsunami! Understanding the Generation, Propagation, and Hazards of Tsunamis
Friday, 3/30/2007 8:00–9:00 AM
[Earth,Middle Level-High School]
Presenters: Lawrence W. Braile (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN); Sheryl J. Braile (Happy Hollow Elementary School: West Lafayette, IN)

We will explore the 12/26/2004 Indonesian tsunami and perform a hands-on activity using an inexpensive, easy-to-construct wave tank to understand tsunami generation, propagation, and hazards.

 

Authentic Earthquake Research in the Classroom
3/30/2007 5:00–6:00 PM
[Earth,Middle Level-College]
Presenters: Jeff Sayers (Indiana Academy: Muncie, IN); Michael Hamburger (Indiana University: Bloomington, IN)

Students and teachers have the opportunity to work with university researchers and to participate in authentic earthquake research projects through the operation of a school seismic station.

 

Earthquakes: Activities and Models for Your Classroom
Saturday, 3/31/2007 9:30–10:30 AM
[Workshop, Earth, Middle Level-High School]
Presenters: Lawrence W. Braile (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN); Gary Lewis (Geological Society of America: Boulder, CO); Christine V. McLelland (Geological Society of America: Boulder, CO)

Experience teaching methods and great activities for your earthquake unit, including invaluable earthquake information, activities, and 3-D models your students can construct. Take home a CD with materials.

 

Earthquake Hazards Along the New Madrid Fault: Using Science to Distinguish Fact from Fiction
Saturday, 3/31/2007 10:00–11:30 AM
[Earth,Grades 9-12]
Presenter: Michael Wysession (Washington University in St. Louis: St. Louis, MO)

The New Madrid Fault was the site of several large earthquakes in 1811 and 1812. Since then, legends have grown to obscure the actual events of the shaking. Recent research shows that the 1811–1812 earthquakes, and chances of near-term repeats, are smaller than previously thought.

 

Civilization Exists Through Geologic Consent
3/31/2007 12:30–1:30 PM
[Earth,Informal Education]
Presenters: Michael Wysession (Washington University in St. Louis: St. Louis, MO)

Geologic events like volcanic eruptions and ocean circulation changes are now known to be responsible for sudden changes in climate that in turn have shaped the course of human civilization. The Fall of Rome, the Black Plague, the French Revolution, and our westward expansion were all triggered by geologic events. Understanding the close link between geologic and human history will help us prepare for the future. (This presentation on earth and space science is part of the NESTA Earth and Space

 

Shaking Up Classrooms with a Simple Seismograph: The IRIS Seismographs In Schools Program
Saturday, 3/31/2007 3:30–4:30 PM
[Earth, Middle Level-High School]
Presenters: Gayle Levy (IRIS Consortium: Washington, DC); John Taber (IRIS Consortium: Washington, DC); Lawrence W. Braile (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN)

Explore classroom uses for a simple seismograph and learn how to obtain your own for free! Teachers already running seismographs can discuss technical questions with visiting seismologists!

 

Earthquake Prediction and Forecasting: A Case Study of the New Madrid Seismic Zone (IRIS)
4/1/2007 8:00–9:00 AM
[Earth,Middle Level-High School]
Presenters: Michael Wysession (Washington University in St. Louis: St. Louis, MO)

Need an answer to: "Why can't we predict or forecast earthquakes?" Discover how to explore this topic with students through an innovative, easily implemented activity.

 

Making Waves: Seismic Waves Activities and Demonstrations
Sunday, 4/1/2007 9:30–10:30 AM
[Workshop, Earth, General]
Presenters: Lawrence W. Braile (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN); Sheryl J. Braile (Happy Hollow Elementary School: West Lafayette, IN)

We will demonstrate and practice several activities for teaching about seismic waves. Hands-on activities include using the Slinkyฎ, the human wave, online seismic wave animations, and software.

 

Earthquakes in the Central United States
Sunday, 4/1/2007 11:00 AM–12:00 PM
[Workshop, Earth, Middle Level-High School]
Presenters: Lawrence W. Braile (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN); Sheryl J. Braile (Happy Hollow Elementary School: West Lafayette, IN)

Investigate earthquakes and seismicity of the Central United States Area using the free Seismic/Eruption software and USGS Central U.S. earthquake maps and satellite images.

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