Report on
BUILDING A COST-EFFECTIVE
SEISMOMETER


submitted
to
Mr. John C. Lahr
and
Mr. Thomas Boyd


prepared by
Team One


December 5, 2002 
Table of Contents



1.0 Introduction 1

1.1 Overview 1
1.2 Goals and Objectives 1

2.0 History 1

2.1 Selection Criteria 2
2.2 Selection Process 3
2.2.1 Mechanical Arm 3
2.2.2 Sensor 3

3.0 Cost Analysis 4

3.1 Initial Cost Estimate 4
3.2 Final Cost Analysis 4

4.0 Division of Components 5

4.1 General Functions and Relationships 6
4.2 Magnetic Sensor 6
4.2.1 Assembly 6
4.2.2 Operation 6
4.2.3 Technical Specifications 7
4.2.4 Meeting Requirements 8
4.3 Mechanical Arm 8
4.3.1 Assembly 8
4.3.2 Operation 9
4.3.3 Technical Specifications 9
4.3.4 Meeting Requirements 9
4.4 Damping Mechanism 9
4.4.1 Assembly 9
4.4.2 Operation 10
4.4.3 Technical Specifications 10
4.4.4 Meeting Requirements 11
4.5 Base and Knife-Edge 11
4.5.1 Assembly 11
4.5.2 Operation 11
4.5.3 Technical Specifications 11
4.5.4 Meeting Requirements 11

5.0 Final Thoughts 12

5.1 Appeal and Educational Value 12
5.2 Details Concerning Our Model 13
5.2.1 Magnet and Coil 13
5.2.2 Mechanical Arm 13
5.2.3 Damping Mechanism 14
5.2.4 Base and Knife-Edge 14

6.0 Documentation 15

6.1 References 15
6.2 Resource 15

7.0 Appendix 16 
1.0 Introduction


1.1 Overview

We intend to address the lack of affordable seismometers in K-16 classrooms and to offer a viable solution to this problem. As our world becomes more technologically advanced, it is beneficial to provide children with technical skills at an early age. If seismometers can become reasonably priced for the public school system, students can expand their knowledge about earthquakes and gain experience with this type of technology.

The major constraints and limitations of this project include sensitivity, cost, and usability. It will:
Cost no more than $150.
Be sensitive enough to measure a magnitude 7 earthquake up to 180˚ away.
Be easy to assemble and operate.
Have a good signal-to-noise ratio.
Have a period up to 20 s.
Allow a computer to record data continuously if desired by the user.

1.2 Goals and Objectives

Our goal is meet the above listed requirements and build a working model; it must be effective and cost efficient for a school setting. Our seismometer must cost less than $150 for mass production ($50 for us to build a model), be sensitive to magnitude 7 earthquakes, and be safe for school-aged children.

Full report in pdf format.

2.1.1 HorseshoeMagnet1
2.1.2 NiobiumMagnets1
2.1.3 HorseshoeWithCoil1

2.1.4 BarMagsWithCoil1

12.1.5 CoilArrangement1

2.2.1 LeadWeight&Bar1
2.3.1 Boom&Damper1
2.3.2 BoomAttachment1
2.3.3 Damper1
2.4.1 ParticleBoardBase1
2.4.2 BaseWithKnifeEdge1
2.4.3 PVCPipeFront1
2.4.4 KnifeEdgeSlot1
3.1.1 CeramicMagnet1
3.1.2 MagnetCombination1
3.2.1 EyeHole&KnifeEdgeSlot1
3.2.2 BarAsKnifeEdge1
3.2.3 GuitarString1
3.2.4 Turnbuckle1
3.2.5 Arm&Mass1
3.2.6 Washers1
3.3.1 Boom&Paddle1
3.3.2 PaddleOrtho1
3.3.3 PaddleIso1
3.3.4 Paddle1
3.4.1 SlottedBarAsKnifeEdge1
3.5.1 FinalProduct1